New Camera, Some Photos, and Salinger

New Camera, Some Photos, and Salinger

NEWSFLASH: This last week I was fortunate enough (a highly underrated phrase to describe what I'm about to tell you) to become the owner of a new, fancy, full-frame DSLR camera. For those of you that know what that means, HOORAY!, and for those of you that don't, just know that it means that I will be taking more photos than ever before because I am so stoked on what this little machine can do. And here to prove it are some pictures from this last week. First, Mike and Tonks, and no, I'm not sorry about the crack and neither is Mike.

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Next, Lindsey, because I just love this picture for some reason. It's like she's convincing us all to buy this chair.

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This camera does incredible things in low light situations, which is the majority of what I find myself shooting these days. During the Minnesota winter the sunrise is at 8am and the sunset is at 4:30pm, and it's so cold out during the day that it's hard to take advantage of the daylight. Our vitamin D levels are in danger of falling off the grid at this time of year, but now I have a new camera to keep me happy and busy!

Next order of business: I have been reading the Salinger biography that came out in 2013, and while I have a lot to say about it and most likely will never finish reading it because the biography itself (while comprehensive and well written) is contrary to my respect for Salinger's longed-for privacy, I will say this: while reading about Salinger's experience in the Hürtgen Forest battle of WWII in 1943, I found a moment to take the following picture of my quiet, safe, suburban life.

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For those of you that have read Salinger, or know anything about him, you know that a biography on his life - especially this book that was released in 2013 and written so well from so many reputable, legitimate sources - would not make him happy. He died in 2010 and when this big-bound book was released in 2013 I had to own it immediately, although I knew I might not ever read it. I started it a week ago and, halfway through, up to the point where Salinger finally published a piece in the New Yorker, is about to marry his second wife, and publish Catcher in the Rye, I decided I can't read anymore. I feel I learned enough about Salinger's formative years as a teenager and his time in the war, and can do without the drama and disappointment of his fans and family as he began to disengage from the public eye.

The book is written brilliantly (the portion that I read) by Shane Salerno and David Shields, and I'm sure the second half is just as insightful as the first. While reading Salinger I also refreshed on a few of his short stories, like "A Perfect Day for a Bananafish" and "For Esmé with Love and Squalor."

In the spirit of American literature and a nod to Salinger's friendship with Ernest Hemingway, I have now taken up A Farewell to Arms for the first time. Wish me luck.

Finally, I'll leave you with this nugget of a moment of mom, sister, and dad. What do you think was happening here?

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Holidays + Baking + Lefse

Holidays + Baking + Lefse

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